Please confirm : Recommended environments

Cover

AXIS Vol.170

2014 July - August
Cover Photographer: Yoshiaki Tsutsui
Feature
Feature

New Crafty—A new approach to crafts

Crafts have been developed in unique ways to contribute to daily living and for the purposes of diffusing and promoting handicraft skills. We use the term "new crafty" to designate the approach of pursuing forms of future crafts and creativity, and explore the present state of "evolving crafts" that are fusing with various ideas and genres.

Cover Interview
Cover Interview

Marije Vogelzang

Marije Vogelzang has been a pioneer in the design of food for the past 15 years. Calling herself an "eating designer" rather than a "food designer," she continues to explore the field of food design based on seven key concepts: The senses, Science, Culture, Technique, Nature, Psychology, and Society. We talked with her about her philosophy and outlook for the future.

Topics
Topics

Ingo Maurer—A high-tech light instilled with the warmth of fire

Ingo Maurer is a lighting designer who continues to be involved energetically in design activities and also runs a lighting brand bearing his own name. I interviewed him about his philosophy of daring to explore new technologies while criticizing today's generic lighting industry; his newly released works spiced with irony and humor; and the present state and future of lighting.

Topics
Topics

The launch of KYOTO Design Lab

Kyoto Institute of Technology launched their new organization KYOTO Design Lab in March 2014, a bold globalization effort centered on researchers and practitioners invited from overseas. The school, which has traditionally nurtured many talented individuals in the fields of architecture and design, has incorporated into the program the resources of the charming city that is Kyoto. What kind of transformation is it attempting? We look at its strategy and lineup.

Traditional Craft Forms
Traditional Craft Forms

Tatami

Part of Japan's unique culture, tatami has been nurtured to suit the nation's climate and way of life. In the Heian Period, aristocrats used thick tatami as a seat and bed, and in the Momoyama Period it became an indispensable part of living with the development of tea ceremony. It is called tatami as they used to overlay (tatamu) the material igusa (rush grass) on a straw base (core). I visited a tatami artisan who continues to make tatami in the traditional way in Sukiya, Kyoto.